Brotherhood Of The Lake – Desperation Is The English Way Vol.2

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Review by Dan Perks

In 2012 Brotherhood of the lake released the terrifyingly raw and potent Desperation Is The English Way Vol.1. The album became a cult favourite amongst hardcore and death metal fans alike. 2013 welcomes the second instalment of this dark saga. Desperation Is The English Way Vol.2 is a raw angry soundtrack depicting the social decline in the world.

At first listen the album feels slightly let down by the production, the guitars sit low and the bass takes a bit more prominence. It’s around halfway through the second play that the epiphany kicks in. The production serves to display the ferocity and hopelessness depicted in the band’s sound. The guitars aren’t as in your face but they appear when needed. Riffs, grooves and solos materialise through the harsh vocals and endless barrage of drums. There’s a very dark metalcore feel to the album, bordering on deathcore at times. Blast beat drums and pummelling bass lines could almost be the backing to a Cannibal Corpse track. The melodies and vocal patterns border on the Converge style of noise/hardcore, such as on the track ‘Black Gates’, Robert Clarke’s Vocals soaring over a swelling of emotional melodies before the song drops into a crushing stomping groove.

Although Desperation Is The English Way Vol.2 is a solid album, it’s going to be live that these songs really come to life. I don’t think this album is the sort of thing you could put on in to sit with at home, and it’s definitely not one to drive to (road rage and speeding fines will occur). After listening to this for a whole weekend all I wanted to do was get hammered and lose my shit in a pit full of angry people who felt the same. This really is a case of buy the album, learn the songs and go nuts when they come to play near you.

BOTL - DITEW 20137 out of 10

Track listing:

  1. Untie The Tempest
  2.  Grief Ritual
  3.  To Stop Breathing
  4.  Live In Fear Of Everything
  5.   Black Gates
  6.  Torment
  7.  Live In Fear Of Nothing
  8.  The English Way